(250) 563 2880 or (250) 562-4526
  
2820 15th Ave. Prince George, BC

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There is a new Artist in Residence at Studio 2880

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The key was handed over on Thursday afternoon, and already the new artist-in-residence at Studio 2880 had customer interest in her paintings.

Carla Joseph Aubichon has barely gotten her paintbrushes set on her new desk and already a passerby offered to purchase the semi-painted work on her easel. It was the kind of exposure she was hoping for, but wasn't expecting in her first morning on the job.

Artist-in-residence isn't really a job in the typical sense. It is the Community Arts Council's way of giving an artist a career boost. The successful artist gets a year of free studio space in the CAC's arts complex at Studio 2880. They also get prime space at CAC events like Studio Fair, Spring Arts Bazaar, their on-site gallery, Art Battle, 6x6 Art Auction, and other high profile opportunities.

Aubichon is the fourth in this now-annual CAC offering. The previous three were, in chronological order, Corey Hardeman, Cliff Mann and most recently Crystalynn Tarr.

One of them, Mann, got such career traction while the artist-in-residence that he never left the building. He rented space in the next studio and is based in that spot today, only six feet from where Aubichon is setting up her shop. It is an open-concept floor plan, so there will be plenty of neighbourly interactions.

"It's a great experience the whole year through," said Mann, who formally presented Aubichon with the keys to the building as a ceremonial welcome. "Having that space got me out of my kitchen, it got me into doing classes, and I'd always wanted to teach art so that happened for me as a result of being the artist-in-residence, and it got me going in a direction I'd always hoped for," Mann said.

"There are so many opportunities that come with this, it really pushes your comfort zone, gets you painting in public, gets your name into the public, it brings up all kinds of interactions that helps market you as an artist but it also helps make you better as an artist."

Aubichon confessed she had never taught art classes before but had that desire and eyed the tables across the hall in the Studio 2880 conference room.

"This is a lot more space than I have at home. I just have the kitchen table and my kids are artists, too, so we all have to share," Aubichon said. "It's great to not have to worry about cleaning everything up when you run out of time, you can have more than one project going at a time, and it's great to be outside the home with all those distractions."

She never had a formal art teacher until her high school years, she said, so to now be surrounded by high level creators of all kinds was a buffet of knowledge she now had available. She was looking forward to having those quick conversations, those passing question-and-answer moments where she and the regular established artists could talk shop. Two of them - Mann and Janice Parker - were right beside her with their display and creation spaces.

That, said CAC president Zelda Craig, was exactly what was envisioned when the artist-in-resident position was invented. All three past ones have seen their careers spiral upwards since they held the key to the building, and it is radiating success into the broader arts community. 

"I had no idea, even being on this board, until the artist-in-resident program started how deep and how wide the pool is in Prince George," said Craig. "We had a number of applicants to be the artist-in-residence this year, and some real talent among them. It was a difficult choice. We hear all the time, now, about how the program is having an effect on connections being developed and relationships developing between artists, and the public getting more of an understanding about local artists because of the work being done and the profiles being built among these few artists who get this chance. It really is having an effect on more than just these four we have selected so far."

Aubichon looks forward to being able to come and go as she pleases from her work space, and being able to tackle some images she's had in her imagination but couldn't get started on for practical reasons in the kitchen at home. She has been a commercially successful artist from years now, but expects her career to really start cooking in this gift of a year at Studio 2880.

Article courtesy The Prince George Citizen

There is a new artist-in-residence at Studio 2880.

On Wednesday, Cliff Mann handed in his keys after a successful year painting at all hours, free of charge, at the studio space owned by the Community Arts Council. The next hand to receive those keys belongs to Crystalynn Tarr who begins her residency immediately.

"This is our third year, but the first two were a pilot program. Our first two were Cliff and Corey Hardeman, they were our guinea pigs, it worked, so Crystalynn is the first to have to go through the whole process of applying and being voted into the position by a panel of jurists," said Community Arts Council executive director Wendy Young.

"Aside from the painting - she is very good at that - she won the position based on the lengths she goes to to create the paint she uses. That really was unheard of - a unique point for the jury to consider," Young added.

"I make the pigment out of dirt and rocks," said Tarr. "On the back of each of my works is a little note that explains where all the colours come from, all the locations of the dirt I used."

Did you know dirt was loaded in colour? Each kind of soil, sand and stone has it. It isn't always the colour it appears to be on first viewing, but once you grind it down to fine particulate then strain it through water and let it settle for days or even weeks, it turns into a liquid useful for painting.

"I was involved in an online class in prehistoric civilizations, and I got addicted to this idea once I learned about it," Tarr said. "Now I owe my husband a few sets of shocks for the vehicle."

Her family and friends often catch her staring off into the distance, distracted by the colours of a hillside or staring at rock configurations. They've stopped counting the number of times she stops the car and they've considered travelling with a book always in tow to kill the unscheduled time she spends wandering around in woods kicking over rocks and rummaging in the soil.

She's even considering a geology degree, so fond and interested she has become in the features of the earth.

She is well accustomed to academia.

"I always really loved art as a child, but also really loved science," she said. "I wore myself out taking so many math and science classes in school but eventually I couldn't graduate unless I took one little quarter-semester fine art class with Keith Carlson. Well wow, I ended up ditching everything else. It just clicked for me. I fell in love with the creative process."

Life intervened. She still pursued sciences, and started a family as well. She was homeschooling her son when she got the chance to participate in the Toni Onley Project at Island Mountain Arts in Wells. Again, the sparks in her brain surged. She devoured a book by star arts/science personality Philip Ball called Bright Earth: Art and the Invention of Color. That's when she knew she had to do more than make art, she had to make the tools that make the art. It was a dirty job, but she had to do it.

You can't get blood from a stone, so they say, but you can certainly get paint and it has the sturdiest colourfast known to humans. Colourfast is the aging property of pigment when it is exposed to light. The pigments derived from plants weaken and fade over time, and that has its place, but the pigments derived from dirt and stone lasts beyond comprehendible time.

"The recipe I use is actually the same one the ancient Egyptians used," Tarr said. "It deepens my enjoyment of the artwork that comes out of it all, but it also gives me more memories and a sense of history about the art work, because I have experiences obtaining the dirt, experiences processing the dirt, and experiences making it into a painting."

All of this was done in her basement, at her mother's house, and on the family kitchen table. Now, thanks to the artist-in-residence program, she has a year to focus hard on her career, because she now has ample space to work in.

"Being able to work here this year will be quite sacred to me," she said.

- See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/entertainment/local-a-e/artist-pulls-colour-from-the-earth-1.2017689#sthash.C2vgmYZC.dpuf

There is a new artist-in-residence at Studio 2880.

On Wednesday, Cliff Mann handed in his keys after a successful year painting at all hours, free of charge, at the studio space owned by the Community Arts Council. The next hand to receive those keys belongs to Crystalynn Tarr who begins her residency immediately.

"This is our third year, but the first two were a pilot program. Our first two were Cliff and Corey Hardeman, they were our guinea pigs, it worked, so Crystalynn is the first to have to go through the whole process of applying and being voted into the position by a panel of jurists," said Community Arts Council executive director Wendy Young.

"Aside from the painting - she is very good at that - she won the position based on the lengths she goes to to create the paint she uses. That really was unheard of - a unique point for the jury to consider," Young added.

"I make the pigment out of dirt and rocks," said Tarr. "On the back of each of my works is a little note that explains where all the colours come from, all the locations of the dirt I used."

Did you know dirt was loaded in colour? Each kind of soil, sand and stone has it. It isn't always the colour it appears to be on first viewing, but once you grind it down to fine particulate then strain it through water and let it settle for days or even weeks, it turns into a liquid useful for painting.

"I was involved in an online class in prehistoric civilizations, and I got addicted to this idea once I learned about it," Tarr said. "Now I owe my husband a few sets of shocks for the vehicle."

Her family and friends often catch her staring off into the distance, distracted by the colours of a hillside or staring at rock configurations. They've stopped counting the number of times she stops the car and they've considered travelling with a book always in tow to kill the unscheduled time she spends wandering around in woods kicking over rocks and rummaging in the soil.

She's even considering a geology degree, so fond and interested she has become in the features of the earth.

She is well accustomed to academia.

"I always really loved art as a child, but also really loved science," she said. "I wore myself out taking so many math and science classes in school but eventually I couldn't graduate unless I took one little quarter-semester fine art class with Keith Carlson. Well wow, I ended up ditching everything else. It just clicked for me. I fell in love with the creative process."

Life intervened. She still pursued sciences, and started a family as well. She was homeschooling her son when she got the chance to participate in the Toni Onley Project at Island Mountain Arts in Wells. Again, the sparks in her brain surged. She devoured a book by star arts/science personality Philip Ball called Bright Earth: Art and the Invention of Color. That's when she knew she had to do more than make art, she had to make the tools that make the art. It was a dirty job, but she had to do it.

You can't get blood from a stone, so they say, but you can certainly get paint and it has the sturdiest colourfast known to humans. Colourfast is the aging property of pigment when it is exposed to light. The pigments derived from plants weaken and fade over time, and that has its place, but the pigments derived from dirt and stone lasts beyond comprehendible time.

"The recipe I use is actually the same one the ancient Egyptians used," Tarr said. "It deepens my enjoyment of the artwork that comes out of it all, but it also gives me more memories and a sense of history about the art work, because I have experiences obtaining the dirt, experiences processing the dirt, and experiences making it into a painting."

All of this was done in her basement, at her mother's house, and on the family kitchen table. Now, thanks to the artist-in-residence program, she has a year to focus hard on her career, because she now has ample space to work in.

"Being able to work here this year will be quite sacred to me," she said.

- See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/entertainment/local-a-e/artist-pulls-colour-from-the-earth-1.2017689#sthash.C2vgmYZC.dpuf

There is a new artist-in-residence at Studio 2880.

On Wednesday, Cliff Mann handed in his keys after a successful year painting at all hours, free of charge, at the studio space owned by the Community Arts Council. The next hand to receive those keys belongs to Crystalynn Tarr who begins her residency immediately.

"This is our third year, but the first two were a pilot program. Our first two were Cliff and Corey Hardeman, they were our guinea pigs, it worked, so Crystalynn is the first to have to go through the whole process of applying and being voted into the position by a panel of jurists," said Community Arts Council executive director Wendy Young.

"Aside from the painting - she is very good at that - she won the position based on the lengths she goes to to create the paint she uses. That really was unheard of - a unique point for the jury to consider," Young added.

"I make the pigment out of dirt and rocks," said Tarr. "On the back of each of my works is a little note that explains where all the colours come from, all the locations of the dirt I used."

Did you know dirt was loaded in colour? Each kind of soil, sand and stone has it. It isn't always the colour it appears to be on first viewing, but once you grind it down to fine particulate then strain it through water and let it settle for days or even weeks, it turns into a liquid useful for painting.

"I was involved in an online class in prehistoric civilizations, and I got addicted to this idea once I learned about it," Tarr said. "Now I owe my husband a few sets of shocks for the vehicle."

Her family and friends often catch her staring off into the distance, distracted by the colours of a hillside or staring at rock configurations. They've stopped counting the number of times she stops the car and they've considered travelling with a book always in tow to kill the unscheduled time she spends wandering around in woods kicking over rocks and rummaging in the soil.

She's even considering a geology degree, so fond and interested she has become in the features of the earth.

She is well accustomed to academia.

"I always really loved art as a child, but also really loved science," she said. "I wore myself out taking so many math and science classes in school but eventually I couldn't graduate unless I took one little quarter-semester fine art class with Keith Carlson. Well wow, I ended up ditching everything else. It just clicked for me. I fell in love with the creative process."

Life intervened. She still pursued sciences, and started a family as well. She was homeschooling her son when she got the chance to participate in the Toni Onley Project at Island Mountain Arts in Wells. Again, the sparks in her brain surged. She devoured a book by star arts/science personality Philip Ball called Bright Earth: Art and the Invention of Color. That's when she knew she had to do more than make art, she had to make the tools that make the art. It was a dirty job, but she had to do it.

You can't get blood from a stone, so they say, but you can certainly get paint and it has the sturdiest colourfast known to humans. Colourfast is the aging property of pigment when it is exposed to light. The pigments derived from plants weaken and fade over time, and that has its place, but the pigments derived from dirt and stone lasts beyond comprehendible time.

"The recipe I use is actually the same one the ancient Egyptians used," Tarr said. "It deepens my enjoyment of the artwork that comes out of it all, but it also gives me more memories and a sense of history about the art work, because I have experiences obtaining the dirt, experiences processing the dirt, and experiences making it into a painting."

All of this was done in her basement, at her mother's house, and on the family kitchen table. Now, thanks to the artist-in-residence program, she has a year to focus hard on her career, because she now has ample space to work in.

"Being able to work here this year will be quite sacred to me," she said.

- See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/entertainment/local-a-e/artist-pulls-colour-from-the-earth-1.2017689#sthash.C2vgmYZC.dpuf

There is a new artist-in-residence at Studio 2880.

On Wednesday, Cliff Mann handed in his keys after a successful year painting at all hours, free of charge, at the studio space owned by the Community Arts Council. The next hand to receive those keys belongs to Crystalynn Tarr who begins her residency immediately.

"This is our third year, but the first two were a pilot program. Our first two were Cliff and Corey Hardeman, they were our guinea pigs, it worked, so Crystalynn is the first to have to go through the whole process of applying and being voted into the position by a panel of jurists," said Community Arts Council executive director Wendy Young.

"Aside from the painting - she is very good at that - she won the position based on the lengths she goes to to create the paint she uses. That really was unheard of - a unique point for the jury to consider," Young added.

"I make the pigment out of dirt and rocks," said Tarr. "On the back of each of my works is a little note that explains where all the colours come from, all the locations of the dirt I used."

Did you know dirt was loaded in colour? Each kind of soil, sand and stone has it. It isn't always the colour it appears to be on first viewing, but once you grind it down to fine particulate then strain it through water and let it settle for days or even weeks, it turns into a liquid useful for painting.

"I was involved in an online class in prehistoric civilizations, and I got addicted to this idea once I learned about it," Tarr said. "Now I owe my husband a few sets of shocks for the vehicle."

Her family and friends often catch her staring off into the distance, distracted by the colours of a hillside or staring at rock configurations. They've stopped counting the number of times she stops the car and they've considered travelling with a book always in tow to kill the unscheduled time she spends wandering around in woods kicking over rocks and rummaging in the soil.

She's even considering a geology degree, so fond and interested she has become in the features of the earth.

She is well accustomed to academia.

"I always really loved art as a child, but also really loved science," she said. "I wore myself out taking so many math and science classes in school but eventually I couldn't graduate unless I took one little quarter-semester fine art class with Keith Carlson. Well wow, I ended up ditching everything else. It just clicked for me. I fell in love with the creative process."

Life intervened. She still pursued sciences, and started a family as well. She was homeschooling her son when she got the chance to participate in the Toni Onley Project at Island Mountain Arts in Wells. Again, the sparks in her brain surged. She devoured a book by star arts/science personality Philip Ball called Bright Earth: Art and the Invention of Color. That's when she knew she had to do more than make art, she had to make the tools that make the art. It was a dirty job, but she had to do it.

You can't get blood from a stone, so they say, but you can certainly get paint and it has the sturdiest colourfast known to humans. Colourfast is the aging property of pigment when it is exposed to light. The pigments derived from plants weaken and fade over time, and that has its place, but the pigments derived from dirt and stone lasts beyond comprehendible time.

"The recipe I use is actually the same one the ancient Egyptians used," Tarr said. "It deepens my enjoyment of the artwork that comes out of it all, but it also gives me more memories and a sense of history about the art work, because I have experiences obtaining the dirt, experiences processing the dirt, and experiences making it into a painting."

All of this was done in her basement, at her mother's house, and on the family kitchen table. Now, thanks to the artist-in-residence program, she has a year to focus hard on her career, because she now has ample space to work in.

"Being able to work here this year will be quite sacred to me," she said.

- See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/entertainment/local-a-e/artist-pulls-colour-from-the-earth-1.2017689#sthash.C2vgmYZC.dpuf

There is a new artist-in-residence at Studio 2880.

On Wednesday, Cliff Mann handed in his keys after a successful year painting at all hours, free of charge, at the studio space owned by the Community Arts Council. The next hand to receive those keys belongs to Crystalynn Tarr who begins her residency immediately.

"This is our third year, but the first two were a pilot program. Our first two were Cliff and Corey Hardeman, they were our guinea pigs, it worked, so Crystalynn is the first to have to go through the whole process of applying and being voted into the position by a panel of jurists," said Community Arts Council executive director Wendy Young.

"Aside from the painting - she is very good at that - she won the position based on the lengths she goes to to create the paint she uses. That really was unheard of - a unique point for the jury to consider," Young added.

"I make the pigment out of dirt and rocks," said Tarr. "On the back of each of my works is a little note that explains where all the colours come from, all the locations of the dirt I used."

Did you know dirt was loaded in colour? Each kind of soil, sand and stone has it. It isn't always the colour it appears to be on first viewing, but once you grind it down to fine particulate then strain it through water and let it settle for days or even weeks, it turns into a liquid useful for painting.

"I was involved in an online class in prehistoric civilizations, and I got addicted to this idea once I learned about it," Tarr said. "Now I owe my husband a few sets of shocks for the vehicle."

Her family and friends often catch her staring off into the distance, distracted by the colours of a hillside or staring at rock configurations. They've stopped counting the number of times she stops the car and they've considered travelling with a book always in tow to kill the unscheduled time she spends wandering around in woods kicking over rocks and rummaging in the soil.

She's even considering a geology degree, so fond and interested she has become in the features of the earth.

She is well accustomed to academia.

"I always really loved art as a child, but also really loved science," she said. "I wore myself out taking so many math and science classes in school but eventually I couldn't graduate unless I took one little quarter-semester fine art class with Keith Carlson. Well wow, I ended up ditching everything else. It just clicked for me. I fell in love with the creative process."

Life intervened. She still pursued sciences, and started a family as well. She was homeschooling her son when she got the chance to participate in the Toni Onley Project at Island Mountain Arts in Wells. Again, the sparks in her brain surged. She devoured a book by star arts/science personality Philip Ball called Bright Earth: Art and the Invention of Color. That's when she knew she had to do more than make art, she had to make the tools that make the art. It was a dirty job, but she had to do it.

You can't get blood from a stone, so they say, but you can certainly get paint and it has the sturdiest colourfast known to humans. Colourfast is the aging property of pigment when it is exposed to light. The pigments derived from plants weaken and fade over time, and that has its place, but the pigments derived from dirt and stone lasts beyond comprehendible time.

"The recipe I use is actually the same one the ancient Egyptians used," Tarr said. "It deepens my enjoyment of the artwork that comes out of it all, but it also gives me more memories and a sense of history about the art work, because I have experiences obtaining the dirt, experiences processing the dirt, and experiences making it into a painting."

All of this was done in her basement, at her mother's house, and on the family kitchen table. Now, thanks to the artist-in-residence program, she has a year to focus hard on her career, because she now has ample space to work in.

"Being able to work here this year will be quite sacred to me," she said.

- See more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/entertainment/local-a-e/artist-pulls-colour-from-the-earth-1.2017689#sthash.C2vgmYZC.dpuf

 

Artisan's Work at Studio 2880